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Posts from the ‘Research News’ Category

US: UC Davis launches produce fact sheets app

UC Davis Postharvest Technology Center: As a global resource, the UC Postharvest Technology Center website is visited over 3 million times a year and contains more than 660 pages and 750 documents with postharvest information and related resources.

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US: Meat, not fresh produce, raises consumer food safety concerns

The Packer: Consumers are much more concerned about raw chicken and raw beef being contaminated than raw fruits and vegetables, according to a new food safety survey.

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AU: “Foodborne diseases: changing epidemiology and disease control” research symposium

1 September 2016

Event co-hosted by the Centre for Infectious Diseases & Microbiology - Public Health (CIDM-PH) and the Marie Bashir Institute (MBI)

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AU/NZ: Innovations in fresh produce safety conference a resounding success

11 August 2016
The Fresh Produce Safety Centre Australia & New Zealand organised an impressive line-up of speakers to present at its third annual Fresh Produce Safety Conference at the University of Sydney on 10 August. They presented to a capacity audience of over 140 people...

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NZ: Massey-hosted food safety partnership awarded $1.25M

Scoop: A new partnership involving nine New Zealand research organisations has been awarded $1.25 million in funding from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. The New Zealand-China Food Protection Network (NZ-CFPN) will enhance communication between research scientists, government organisations and industries here and in China

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US: Metrics proposed to prevent the harvest of leafy green crops exposed to floodwater contaminated with Escherichia coli

Allied and Environmental Microbiology: In this study, the suitability of the LGMA metrics for farms in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States was evaluated. The upper end of a spinach bed (in Beltsville, MD) established on a −5% grade was flooded with water containing 6 log CFU/ml Escherichia coli to model a worst-case scenario of bacterial movement through soil. While E. coli was quickly detected at the 9-m distance within 1 day in the spring trial and within 3 days in the fall trial, no E. coli was detected on plants outside the flood zone after 14 days.

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UK: New diagnostic tests could hamper tracking of foodborne illness

Food Safety Watch: So-called culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs) help doctors diagnose foodborne infections in a matter of hours because they do not depend on traditional bacterial culture techniques, which often take several days to complete. Unfortunately, the absence of a bacterial culture makes it difficult to obtain detailed information from the bacteria responsible for the infection, such as genetic fingerprint and genome sequencing data.

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NL: Around the world in 1,475 Salmonella geo-serotypes

Emerging Infectious Diseases: It’s easy to remember Salmonella serotypes names, isn’t it? Surely, this is because the naming system of Salmonella serotypes is by far the most scientist friendly. Traditionally, most Salmonella serotypes have been named after geographic locations. We decided to explore the geographic locations to which Salmonella serotypes refer and describe some unexpected twists in the naming scheme. We found that 93% (n = 1,475) of the 1,585 serotypes could be categorized as geo-serotypes; that is, the name refers to a geographic location.

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AU: Reports on the use of nanotechnology in food additives and packaging

Food Standards Australia New Zealand: In 2015 an expert toxicologist prepared two reports for FSANZ on the potential use of nanotechnologies in existing food additives and food packaging. The reports were then peer reviewed by an expert pharmacologist and toxicologist to evaluate whether the conclusions for each of the reports were supported by the weight of evidence in scientific literature. The peer review agreed with the overall conclusions of the reports.

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AU: Cassava: the staple crop that can kill you

Food Processing: Easy to cultivate and drought-tolerant, the cassava plant is eaten by a billion people around the world every day. But its popularity is also its weakness, as attacks by pests and diseases have a potentially huge impact on food security. It’s also the only staple crop that can kill you or cause chronic neurological disease if it’s not processed, potentially producing fatal levels of cyanide when drought-stressed.

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