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Posts from the ‘Crisis Management’ Category

The cost of a food safety crises. How high it can go!

25 July 2016
‘We are fortunate to have secured Mr William Marler as a speaker for this year’s Fresh Produce Safety Conference,’ said Fresh Produce Safety Centre Chair, Michael Worthington.

Mr Marler is a well known personal injury lawyer and expert in foodborne illness litigation at Marler Clark, a major force in food safety policy in the United States and abroad,’ Mr Worthington said.

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AU-NZ: Food Standards launches template for food recall plans

Food Standards Australia New Zealand: Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) has developed a Food Recall Plan template to help food businesses manage recalls. FSANZ Chief Executive Officer Steve McCutcheon said every food business needs to be able to quickly remove unsafe food from the marketplace to protect the health and safety of consumers. “The template developed by FSANZ is particularly aimed at helping smaller businesses ensure they have a food recall plan in place and know what to do if something goes wrong,” Mr McCutcheon said.

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AU: Electronic recall system receives HACCP certification

Food Processing: GS1 Australia’s electronic product recall notification management system has received certification from HACCP Australia. The Recall service — designed to minimise the impact and cost of food and beverage products recalled and withdrawn from the supply chain — has been certified as ‘effective and suitable for businesses that operate a HACCP based Food Safety Programme’.

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UK: A detailed [product recall] plan of action

The Business Continuity Institute: As product recalls increasingly dominate the headlines, Vince Shiers explains why careful planning is critical to ensuring companies are primed to respond no matter what the circumstances.

Product recalls are never far from the headlines. In our experience, if a company doesn’t have a recall plan before a recall incident, they will make sure they have one afterwards.

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US: Product recalls rise with better detection and fewer suppliers

New York Times: Frozen peas that could make you sick. A water heater that might explode. Cars with steering wheels that were prone to fail and cause a crash. Those are just a few of the thousands of products that manufacturers have recalled this year — and the deluge shows no sign of slowing. Across almost every product category, the scope and complexity of recalls are on the rise.

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UK: Silence is far from golden

The Business Continuity Institute: Farzad Henareh explains how an effectively managed product recall event can serve to enhance brand loyalty, but preparation and constant communication are key.

In the past, companies have been reluctant to enter the recall process, worried that their brand will suffer by being associated with a problem. In fact, the opposite is now true, and if a recall is handled efficiently and quickly customers will understand the situation and may even be impressed by the quality of customer service.

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US: Take those food-outbreak headlines with a grain of salt

Fortune.com: Is anything safe to eat these days? The regular flow of news on how pathogens in our food are making us sick—or, in the most extreme cases, even killing us—might make it seem like we’re taking a big risk every time we sit down for a meal or a snack.

But all those headlines—stay with me here—might actually be a good thing. Yes, it seems counter-intuitive. But in reality, we may not be facing more cases of food-borne illness but instead getting better at finding them and tracing them back to the source.

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AU: Frozen berries still on the shelf after Hep A scare a year ago

Sydney Morning Herald: In the middle of February last year, the frozen berry lost some of its sweetness. Victoria's Department of Health and Human Services decreed - very publicly - that the popular Nanna's Frozen Mixed Berry 1kg bag had been linked to multiple cases of hepatitis A.

While Patties Foods is getting out of berries, it's not out of trouble. Law firm Slater & Gordon remains committed to action they started on behalf of more than 20 clients.

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NZ: Crisis management critical in social media age

stuff.co.nz: In a time when social media gives new meaning to news "spreading like wildfire", it is increasingly critical to have a good crisis management plan in place.

With the use of social media, it is critical that crisis management plans include social media as a matter of course.

[Nestle Australia chairwoman Elizabeth Proust] says a thorough crisis management approach includes prior testing and simulation of different scenarios and a set of steps in place to deal with potential crises.

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Take a deep breath and reflect on the hep A saga, suggests Richard Bennett

I’ve given a few presentations over recent years about crisis management, starting with the need to prevent a crisis as much as possible by having the right attitude towards food safety backed up with the necessary systems. I put attitude first for a reason.

The next stage is to be prepared. Despite the best prevention systems and intentions, glitches happen and you might find yourself in need of a plan to manage the unthinkable. Good prevention and preparation will make all the difference to response and recovery. There’s plenty of evidence to show that resilience – the ability to bounce back – is almost directly related to how you respond, which is directly related to what you have done to prevent and prepare.

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